The development of ion therapy against cancer is debated at the House of Science in Valencia

The conference opens a debate on the benefits of this new technique against cancer and addresses the technological challenges necessary to achieve its application in the medical field. Organised by the Institute of Corpuscular Physics (IFIC-UV/CSIC), the Centre for Energy, Environmental and Technological Research (CIEMAT) and the Castellón Provincial Hospital Foundation, the debate will take place at the CSIC House of Science in Valencia.

The headquarters of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) in the Valencian Community will host a conference on Tuesday, November 22, to discuss the future of ion therapy in the fight against cancer in Spain. With the attendance of more than 60 experts from the fields of research, health, industry and public administration, the meeting opens a debate on the benefits of this new technique in an international context of the implementation of therapies with heavy particles against cancer. In addition, the technological challenges necessary to achieve its application in the medical field are addressed.

Both conventional radiotherapy and hadrontherapy require accelerators that send the particles to the tumour tissue to destroy it. Radiotherapy uses photons, while hadrontherapy uses heavier particles such as protons or ions. The complexity of heavy particle accelerators makes their implementation in hospitals more difficult, although this type of therapy has advantages: it is more effective, allows localised treatment of the tumour, and reduces toxicity.

The conference brings together representatives of CSIC centres, the CIEMAT, Valencian public universities and other research organisations (CIPF, Curie Institute of Paris, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy), together with doctors (La Fe, University Clinic and General of Valencia, San Juan de Alicante, Castellón, Vall d’Hebron in Barcelona and the University of Navarra Clinic in Madrid), representatives of the Centre for Technological Development and Innovation (CDTI, Ministry of Science and Innovation), of the Spanish Association of the Science Industry (INEUSTAR) and the Valencian Innovation Agency (AVI). The regional secretaries for Universities and Research, Carmen Beviá, and for Health Efficiency and Technology, Concha Andrés , as well as the executive vice-president of the Valencian Innovation Agency (AVI), Andrés García Reche , the vice-rector for Research of the University of Valencia, Carlos Hermenegildo , and the Vice President of Organisation and Institutional Relations of the CSIC, Carlos Closa.

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