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Results 1 - 17 of 17.


History / Archeology - 04.10.2022
A research in the Abric del Pastor of Alcoi manages to isolate an episode of Neanderthal occupation
A research in the Abric del Pastor of Alcoi manages to isolate an episode of Neanderthal occupation
A research by six scientific institutions in the Abric del Pastor of Alcoi, including the universities of Valencia (UV) and Alicante (UV), has managed, through an interdisciplinary approach, to characterise a moment in the life of a Neanderthal group. This research has reduced the palimpsest effect (superimposition of multiple occupation episodes on the same surface over a long period of time) to a time resolution very close to the life of said group.

History / Archeology - 14.09.2022
New data on how Levantine art was made and how it has been preserved to date
New data on how Levantine art was made and how it has been preserved to date
Although Levantine art has been recognized as World Heritage rock art and Asset of Cultural Interest by the UNESCO, we still have little information on how these cave paintings, typical of the Mediterranean area about 7,500 years ago, were made. Now, a study published in the journal PLOS ONE on the Levantine art site in el Carche (Valencia, Spain) identifies for the first time four different formulas used by the prehistoric communities to get paint by mixing minerals.

History / Archeology - 26.07.2022
Published the complete study of the Iberian site of Casa de Cabeza of Requena, where wine production for more than 2,000 years has been documented
A multidisciplinary team with the participation of David Quixal, Consuelo Mata, Yolanda Carrión and Guillem Pérez, professors at the University of Valencia (UV), together with UV researchers, just pu

Physics - History / Archeology - 18.07.2022
A physical-nuclear technique fixes for the first time the origin of Valencian flint and establishes new mobility parameters in the Paleolithic
A physical-nuclear technique fixes for the first time the origin of Valencian flint and establishes new mobility parameters in the Paleolithic
An international team of researchers, led by the professor of the University of Valencia (UV) Aleix Eixea, has applied for the first time a technique from nuclear physics, Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), to determine the origin of some flint from Middle and Upper Palaeolithic sites in the current provinces of Valencia and Alicante.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 17.07.2022
When did the genetic variations that make us human emerge?
The study of the genomes of our closest relatives, the Neanderthals and Denisovans, has opened up new research paths that can broaden our understanding of the evolutionary history of Homo sapiens. A study led by the UB has made an estimation of the time when some of the genetic variants that characterise our species emerged.

History / Archeology - 24.06.2022
Prehistoric stele found in the funerary complex of Cañaveral de León
Prehistoric stele found in the funerary complex of Cañaveral de León
An international research that integrates experts from the universities of Durham, Seville, Southampton, Huelva and Gothenburg has just located a prehistoric stela, of the type known as 'warrior' in the burial complex of Cañaveral de León (Huelva). This is the second stela found in this site.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 02.06.2022
What oxytocin can tell us about the evolution of human prosociality
What oxytocin can tell us about the evolution of human prosociality
Modern humans are characterized by their prosociality, a broad term that encompasses intraspecies empathy, social tolerance, cooperation and altruism. These facets of social cognition have been associated with variations in the oxytocin and vasotocin genes (OT and VT) and their receptors (OTR and VTR).

History / Archeology - Art and Design - 27.05.2022
More than ten artistic manifestations between 1338 and 1538 spawned the myth of James I as the founding king
Francesc Granell Sales, a researcher at the University of Valencia, has analysed the representation of King James I in visual culture during the period 1338-1538.

Environment - History / Archeology - 14.04.2022
An open-air Neanderthal habitat over 120,000 years old is discovered in Aspe
An open-air Neanderthal habitat over 120,000 years old is discovered in Aspe
A research team from the Department of Prehistory, Archaeology and Ancient History of the University of Valencia (UV) led by Professor Aleix Eixea, in collaboration with the University of Alicante (UA), the Bizkaiko Arkeologi Museoa and the Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution of France have discovered and dated in Aspe (Alicante) an open-air Neanderthal habitat over 120,000 years old in the Natural Park of Los Aljezares.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 16.03.2022
An archaeological investigation analyses peasant life in Roman Spain
An archaeological investigation analyses peasant life in Roman Spain
The archaeology of the Roman period has traditionally been focused on monumental aspects, but very little is known about what the daily life of peasantry was like. An investigation by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) delves into the life of peasant settlements based on the archaeological findings discovered in the Community of Madrid, in the numerous rescue excavations that were carried out during the real estate bubble period.

History / Archeology - 17.09.2021
A comprehensive dating research expands the Neanderthal occupation period in Cova del Gegant
A comprehensive dating research expands the Neanderthal occupation period in Cova del Gegant
The most comprehensive and exact dating to date of the Cova del Gegant (Sitges, Garraf) has been published. This is the site with most Neanderthal remains in Catalonia and a unique place to study the Middle-to-Upper Palaeolithic transition, when the first populations of anatomically modern humans appeared and the Neanderthals disappeared.

History / Archeology - 02.08.2021
The analysis of one of the oldest paintings in the world confirms its human origins
The analysis of one of the oldest paintings in the world confirms its human origins
One of the main challenges in archaeology is to discover the time when the symbols appeared and the implications of their use in human behaviour. The oldest paintings found to date are those from the three Spanish caves in Caceres, Cantabria and Malaga, which would be about 65,000 years old. Their dating brought an intense debate in the scientific community, because it suggests that the paintings would have been made by Neandertals.

History / Archeology - 07.07.2021
Findings of a cave painting with the best scene of honey harvesting in the Levantine art
Findings of a cave painting with the best scene of honey harvesting in the Levantine art
The findings of a new site of cave paintings in Castellote (Teruel) have brought to light the scene of a person climbing a ladder to get honey from a beehive about 7,500 years ago. This is the most elaborate and well-preserved painting on this gatherer activity documented to date within the Levantine art, developed on the Mediterranean coast of the Iberian Peninsula.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 06.05.2021
Human burial from 78,000 years ago in Africa
Human burial from 78,000 years ago in Africa
Àfrica Pitarch, Beatriu de Pinós researcher in the Prehistoric Studies and Research Seminar of the UB (SERP-UB) 000 years ago. Researchers found remains of a child aged between 2.5 and 3, in a shallow grave in the site of Panga ya Saidi (Kenya). This burial joins other evidence of the first social complex behaviour seen in Homo Sapiens.

History / Archeology - Environment - 15.04.2021
To improve climate models, an international team with the participation of UPF turns to archaeological data
The project, called LandCover6k, offers a new classification system that the researchers hope will improve predications about the planet's future and fill in gaps about its past. .Published in PLOS ONE , the study includes the participation of researchers from the universities of Pennsylvania, Pompeu Fabra and Glasgow, including Marco Madella, ICREA research professor of the Department of Humanities at UPF, who is one of the project leaders.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 25.03.2021
The origin and uniqueness of basque genetics revealed
The origin and uniqueness of basque genetics revealed
A new study reveals that the genetic uniqueness of the Basque population is not due to its external origin in respect of other Iberian populations, but reduced contacts as of the Iron Age. The genomic analysis points to the language barrier as a possible bastion which led to the isolation of the people.