The Group of Teaching Innovation in Microbiology welcomed the Connecticut State Community College in the framework of the Tiny Earth

The Group of Teaching Innovation in Microbiology welcomed the Connecticut State Community College in the framework of the Tiny Earth Project



Teachers and students from the Connecticut State Community College in front of the Charles Darwin Hall’s stage.

The members of the Consolidated Group of Teaching Innovation (GCID) in Microbiology of the Universitat de València welcomed on Thursday, 23 May teachers and students from the Connecticut State Community College from the US at the Burjassot Campus. Both the team led by Professor Sharon Gusky and the teachers from the UV-s Department of Microbiology and Ecology are actively involved in the Micromón/Tiny Earth project.

Both groups aim to raise awareness in the pre-university education community about the urgent health problem of superbugs and the need to continue to search for new antibiotics. The project is led at the Universitat de València by Sergi Maicas, in collaboration with CEFIRE Valencia, and has been developed in different educational centres in the Valencian Community.

The tour was led by Professors Belén Fouz and Elena González-Biosca and master’s degree student Isabel Salas, from the Faculty of Biological Sciences. The meeting began with an introduction to the GCID’s activities at national and international level, such as the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance and the characterisation of antibiosis phenomena. Possible future projects for both groups were also discussed.

The tour continued with a visit to the Burjassot Campus, including the teaching laboratories, the Charles Darwin Hall and the Eduard Boscà Scienc Library, where the management teams of the Faculty of Biological Sciences and the Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences were also present. Finally, they visited the aquarium experimental plant facilities of the Central Support Service for Experimental Research (SCSIE), where they explained how they are used by the university and business community for teaching and research.

The Tiny Earth meeting was a great success and allowed common interests to be reinforced, ideas to be exchanged, and possible future student exchanges to be assessed. Professor Gusky and her team showed great interest in the work of the UV’s team and appreciated the campus facilities and their welcome.